6.04.2014

IWSG - June

This post is part of the Insecure Writer's Support Group, a bloghop dedicated to writers supporting one another through this crazy thing called 'being a writer'. 

Just a quick IWSG today before I get going on work... This is my busy season at my Day Job so I tend to spend a lot of time just daydreaming about writing rather than actually doing it. Word and creativity output become very difficult when I'm working 60 hour weeks, ya know? (though I'm sure there are those of you who do it and I bow in awe your willpower. My brain is just too fried to do any more). As I'm seeing my WIP 'last update' date disappear from the rearview mirror, I find myself daydreaming of a different way of life. 

For those of you with Day Jobs, do you ever think about what it would be like to just quit and write full-time? Or, write and be a stay at home parent, or write and maybe go back to school? That's kind of part of the dream, right? To be able to live off the writing that we love doing. It's kind-of scary too though. For those of you who have done it, how did you make the leap? Did you wait until you hit a certain income from your writing before quitting your Day Job, or was it a realization that you couldn't achieve a workable writing income while spending 40+ hours per week doing something else? 

Don't get me wrong - I love my Day Job. But during busy season, I really miss being able to write, to blog, to read others' posts. I find myself in a place of 'figuring things out' this summer. There's definitely part of me that wants to make a leap, but I also love what I do here. Is there a way to balance it all? 

24 comments:

  1. I totally understand a fried brain--and I only worked 40 hrs/week. My creativity was shot. I don't know how those who work full time, have a young family and all that entails, and they still put out a minimum of a book/year. I'm lucky that I'm now retired and can write full time. Give yourself a break and refill that well by reading and doing what you enjoy. Best wishes.

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    1. Yeah I don't know how some folks do it either! I do pretty well when I'm not in busy season, but for these three months in the summer... forget about it.

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  2. I work from home. I'm a piano teacher and a free-lance writer. It's working for me. I know some writers who quit their day jobs and do free-lance and e-lance jobs and are making it work. We have to budget our time!
    Play off the Page

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    1. That's a lot to be doing! Glad it works for you!

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  3. I am SO blessed to be retired, funny thing is now I wonder how I got everything done when I was working. Always something on the To DO list...LOL!

    D.B. McNicol
    Romance & Mystery...writing my life

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    1. I always feel similarly when I'm on vacation :)

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  4. My 4 kids are home for the summer and it's hard to find time to focus. GL!

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    1. Yikes! No doubt. That's a lot of distractions running around!

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  5. I daydream of quitting my day job all the time . . .even though I love the work. It's soul-consuming and it's hard to balance with other loves and responsibilities.

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    1. Amen. That's right where I'm at.

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  6. That's a lot of hours.
    I actually enjoy my job and have never considered writing full time. Too much pressure and I just write too slow.

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    1. It is a lot, yup. Still surviving though!

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  7. I really admire those writers who juggle family commitments, including small children plus domestic chores... and a day job... and still find time to write!
    Writer In Transit

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  8. Balance is always hard to find but I think it is possible especially when you are really passionate about something. Hang in there during the busy season!

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  9. I'm a stay-at-home mom and writer. I thought that meant I'd have all the time in the world, but quickly discovered it meant I had less. Go figure. The kids are finally both in school (except for summer break, which they're now on), so I have a little more time, but I'm a professional at finding other things to take up my time. I think it comes down to...if you have the will to write, you will find the time to write. No matter what you're doing, it's a juggling act. I've got too many volunteer jobs, but I'm working on getting rid of them one by one so I can hopefully make a living as a writer.

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  10. I can't see me ever turning to writing for a living. I love writing too much. I mean to say I want to write what I want to MY Way. I've had the luxery of staying at home between the birth of each child and thier start of school. Amazing days I'll always treasure. And my 54 year old self ain't working a 60 hour week for nobody!
    Barbara
    Life & Faith in Caneyhead

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  11. I had 2 years where I was unable to find a day job and had all the time in the world to write. It was nice, but also stressful because money was tight and I was unable to spare much towards my book in hopes of getting to readers so my writing could contribute to the family income. Now I have a part time job (try to be part time. It depends on coworker woes if I work 20 hours or 40 hours a week) that gives me money to use towards my writing. And bills.

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  12. Too funny! Because of my demanding day job, one of my sons (who's been so supportive) was just chiding me tonight about needing to quit work. Dang bills and the need to eat. I would so do it in a flash. lol But I'm 5 1/2 years away from retirement when I really can quit work and still bring in money.

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  13. Jobs tend to get in the way of the most important things, like life!
    If I could balance it all out I would have my family as my full time PAYING job. Thats right get paid to love your family, but that is't going to happen so getting paid for what I do now is ok.

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  14. I'm a stay-at-home-mom and I struggle to find the time to write. There are a lot of distractions (just looking at my house and the organizing that should be happening, for example) or the cleaning, then the normal chores...The kids are pretty self-sufficient, but I'm so far behind in life due to my medical stuff that I feel like I'm playing catch-up all the time.
    I guess it's a matter of me just self-disciplining myself to do it. I recently joined a Goal Partners group where we share a website, put up our goals each week, and hold each other accountable with encouragement or a swift kick if that's what's needed...so far I've gotten a lot more writing done...well, if you don't count how evil blogger has been to me lately...
    Thinking of you and your impossible schedule. Take care!
    Tina @ Life is Good
    On the Open Road! @ Join us for the 4th Annual Post-Challenge Road Trip!

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  15. I'd have to work with an agent to succeed because I'm not good at time management unless I have little to no free time then somehow miracles happen. :-)

    Anna from Shout with Emaginette

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  16. That's a good question, AJ. Right now, I work for a company that does all its work on contract. My goal is that sometime in the next few years I'll have improved to the point where I can venture off on my own and work as an indie contractor. If that's the case, you know my new boss would be lenient in terms of hours if I want to write more :) Best of luck through the busy season!

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  17. I finally found out what it's like not to be working. Not having my old income kind of scuks, but having the time as my own is kind of nice. I used to regularly work 50 to 60 hours a week and often over 70 during busy season, but I was the manager and I did what I had to do. But I dreamed a lot too. Now my dreams are real and they aren't paying the bills.

    Hope you achieve the balance or better and your writing dreams become reality. And you can support yourself comfortably doing it. Good luck!

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

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  18. Yeah it's tough juggling writing with other jobs. I try for a balance but it usually looks a bit lopsided. Regardless of what I'm doing or where I'm going, I take the first 30 minutes of the day to write, much longer if time allows.

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